LDAP Identity source and vCenter

Whenever we installed a new vCenter the activity always included integration with Active Directory and normally IWA (Integrated Windows Authentication) was used.
Since vSphere 7.0 version this possibility has been deprecated
so it is good to start with the integration of the vCenter with Active Directory via LDAP.
In our case, we will use LDAPS which uses a certificate

For first the step we need to create the certificate:

  • Use SSH to vCenter connection

On shell use this command

openssl s_client -connect <DC FQDN>:636 -showcerts

Copy the certificate output with  —–BEGIN CERTIFICATE—– and —–END CERTIFICATE—–

Past on Notepad and save with .crt extension

Now we will go to configure the Identity Sources on vCenter:

  • Login as Single Sign-On Administrator to vCenter
  • Navigate to Menu > Administration > Single Sign-On Configuration
  • In the Identity Provider tab, open Identity Sources
  • Click ADD
  • Select Active Directory over LDAP or OpenLDAP, depending on your directory type.

Fill out the remaining fields as follows:
Identity Source Name: Label
Base DN for users: The Distinguished Name (DN) of the starting point for directory server searches. Example: “DC=pollaio,DC=lan”.
Base DN for groups: The Distinguished Name (DN) of the starting point for directory server searches.
Domain name: Your domain name. Example: “pollaio.lan”
Domain alias: Your NetBIOS name. Example: “pollaio.lan”
Username: Domain user with at least browse privileges. Example: “pollaio\administrator”.
Connect to:  “ldaps://<DC FQDN>”.

  • Click Browse next to SSL Certificate
  • Select the .cer file created in before step
Now we are ready to login to the vCenter with domain user (remember to assign the correct permission to domain group or user group)

If you want check the correct use of SSL certificate on the authentication to Active Directory with LDAP connection check the websso.log:

LDAP Identity source and vCenter

Capture Code – vSphere Web Client

One of the conveniences of administering VMware solutions is being able to use code to create scripts to perform repetitive tasks or automate processes

One of the vSphere Web Client features that can help those new to the PowerCli is the Capture Code, it basically allows you to list and save the Powercli commands of the actions you are doing with the vSphere Web Client.

To activate it just access the vSphere Web Client, from the Menu select Developer Center

Select Code Capture and enable it by placing the “Enable Code Capture” flag on the right (which turns green)

At this point, a space will appear in our frame where the commands will be listed with some operations, such as Clear and start another, Copy and Download

Where the Download option generates you the ps1 file with the Powercli commands of the recorded operations

To start and stop a recording session you can use the buttons:

Or the red button that appears at the top of the WebClient once “Enable Code Capture” is enabled

Bye

Capture Code – vSphere Web Client

Ingest your VMware VCSA Appliance logs into Azure Sentinel

In an old post, I described how to send ESXi logs to Azure Log Analytics to ingest at Azure Sentinel, now I describe Step to Step how to send vCenter logs.

The first step is to do step by step this configuration:

After this we need to:
  • Change to the settings of VCSA Appliance to send the logs to Syslog Gateway Server
  • Configure the Log Analytics Agent, installed on Syslog Gateway Server to process the Facility Local0
  • Change la function VMwareESXi (It was created for ESXi Log check my old post) or create a query custom to parse the log on Azure Log Analytics

Change to the settings of VCSA Appliance to send the logs to Syslog Gateway Server

For configuring the VCSA you can use this VMware KB

Forward vCenter Server Log Files to Remote Syslog Server (vmware.com)

Protocol and port depend on your infrastructure configuration (you need to enable communication from VCSA to Syslog Gateway Server on the select TCP/UDP port)

and enable send events (it is enabled by default, but a check is a good idea)

Configure Streaming of Events to a Remote Syslog Server (vmware.com)

Now you can connect to the Syslog Gateway Server and check if the Syslog server received the logs from the VCSA Appliance

Use SSH to connect at the Syslog Gateway Server and use this command

cat /var/log/syslog | grep <fqdn vCenter> | more

in my situation

cat /var/log/syslog | grep vcenter | more

Configure the Log Analytics Agent, installed on Syslog Gateway Server to process the Facility Local0

Connect to Azure Portal and on Azure Log Analytics Service enable the correct facility (local0)

After 10/15 minutes the new configuration will be applied on Syslog Gateway Server (you can check the file /etc/rsyslog.d/95-omsagent.conf on Syslog Gateway)

Change the VMwareESXi function (It was created for ESXi Log check my old post) or create a query custom to parse the log on Azure Log Analytics

Finally, you can query the data on Azure Log Analytics

Syslog | where HostName contains “<FQDN vCenter>”

or optionally you can edit the function create for Ingest ESXi log (check my old POST) and insert the vCenter FQDN Name in the same position where there is the ESXi FQDN Name.

Currently, on Azure Sentinel there are no specific Workbooks for VMware, all queries are to be created

Ingest your VMware VCSA Appliance logs into Azure Sentinel

Check HW VMware Compatibility Matrix

I need to check the Compatibility Matrix for the network IO device of ESXi HOST

Connect to ESXi with SSH and start this command

vmkchdev -l | grep vmnic

and the value are:

If you want check storage IO device change vmnic to vmhba

Determining Network/Storage firmware and driver version in ESXi (1027206) (vmware.com)

Check HW VMware Compatibility Matrix